Vinkubala, a Zambian Snack

People these days go crazy about healthy and organic food or superfood. All that for the “western world” is very expensive while in places like Chinkonono it is so easy to get.

One of our coordinators, Wesley (Lloyd’s brother), has sent some pics and info about one of the village’s favourite snacks: Vinkubala…caterpillars.

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Lots of yummy colourful caterpillars…a healthy snack

What? Yeah..caterpillars. What sounds like the most stereotype thing to say about Africa is actually a very, very healthy part of PAF members’ diet.

In Chinkonono those caterpillars are called Vinkubala. Wesley set out to catch them to bring home a surprise for his family for New Years Day.

As you can see the kids went crazy about them.

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Digging in

 

Those caterpillars can be found in some trees in the field around December and January. It is mostly a popular relish or snack around Southern Region.

Vinkubala provide the body with a lot of proteins, vitamines and many more nutrients. That is why during the 2 months people try to eat as many as they can. They are a valuable and important addition to the regular diet. Even the Zambian government recommends eating caterpillars.

As you can imagine, thinking of caterpillars, most kids at first are a bit hesitant and even scream when they see or touch them for the first time. But on the other hand they are more than eager to have them.

 

How to eat vinkubala, you ask? Well…obviously you put them in a dish and kids will try sort out the biggest ones for themselves first. πŸ˜‰ Then you have to get the outer shell off and remove the insides. Apply some salt, let them sit there for a few hours or a day. Then they are ready to be fried or cooked. You can add any ingredients you see fit.

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Yummy?! πŸ˜‰

Would you eat them? πŸ˜‰

 

Vinkubala, a Zambian Snack

A Long-Awaited Visitor ;)

Finally! Julie made it back to Zambia after 2 years. And guess where she went: Chinkonono Village of course!

Check our awesome new Slideshow to see what happened in the village and what progress we made while Julie was there:

Julie had a big To-Do-List to check πŸ˜‰ As you know we have been announcing a market place and kitchen for ages. So we planned to get both structures roofed within that week. We managed for the kitchen. So that is good. The market we only could do half because we lacked grass to that the roof the traditional Tonga way. But we are confident that it will be done very soon.

Also our building that houses the library and sewing room for now was supposed to be painted nicely. Unfortunately there was a lot of plastering to do to fix dents and window sills. But Jason and Albert worked hard. So with a slight delay the ladies, Julie, Wesley and many other hands could start painting.

For the rooms we chose water-based white paint and for the lower part white oil paint so we can wash of prints of dirty kids’ hands πŸ˜‰ Door and window frames are painted in a dark green. For the front wall and pillars outside we chose white oil paint to be able to wash them too. Also Wesley and Julie practiced their sign writer skills and wrote Planting A Future onto the top part of the front wall.

What can I say? It looks beautiful and bright and people can see it from afar. Our members are so proud, especially the women. They say that nobody has a nicely painted wall our house at home. And to quote Media: “Not all men’s work has to be done by men only. We can do that too!”…she refers to the whole painting job, which was very interesting and exciting for our ladies.

But now lean back and take 12 minutes to watch the Slideshow! Please share if you like it! πŸ™‚

A Long-Awaited Visitor ;)

Waking useful memories

The rain season is winding up and farmers are preparing storehouses for their produce.

As you all know the main objective of PAF is to improve food security in the villages and rural areas. Hence it would be a desaster if we stopped encouraging farmers to plant fruit trees and high food value crops like cowpeas and moringa without taking care of storage after harvest.

While Lloyd 2as in town to wait for some papers and certificates tobe processed he was taken on a tour of traditional food storehouses.

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Traditional silos to store food

There are various models of storehouses from all corners of Zambia. These have been in use to protect food from pests, animals and weather. They are cheap to build and maintain as they are wholly made from local materials.

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Different types of silos

It is imperative to teach (or is it reteach?) the community how to build these structures so that they can store their produce in them…unlike the current trend where food is stored in houses where people live.

We have a lot of sunflower, cowpeas and moringa leaves already…and those will be stored in these to-be-built silos.

You see…new missions on a daily base πŸ˜‰ But we are on it.

Waking useful memories