PAF Vegetable Garden

As you probably remember we moved our greenhouses to PAF Center a while ago. This turned out to be very convenient for everyone.

Now we decided to try again with a vegetable garden. So we are now planting our veggies and fixing the shade net to our garden. This has been long in the making and is bearing fruit as all materials are available.

 

But don’t think all this has been easy. We used some of the money that PAF raised through donations and the annual fees of our supporting members to buy what was missing. But getting the materials from A to B to Chinkonono was a bit of a struggle. Some of those huge poles had to travel for more than 15km on an ox cart. Hard work.

We are using this project to educate members on effective vegetable farming and flower gardening. Kids and youths from Chinkonono can come to PAF Center and learn how to plant and take care of different types of seedlings and also when and how to harvest and re-plant.

 

Also the garden will be used as a means to raise funds by selling our products at PAF Market. We are planting cabbage, onions, sugar loaf, tomatoes and many other vegetables suitable for the climate and which can be consumed by local people.

PAF Vegetable Garden

Vinkubala, a Zambian Snack

People these days go crazy about healthy and organic food or superfood. All that for the “western world” is very expensive while in places like Chinkonono it is so easy to get.

One of our coordinators, Wesley (Lloyd’s brother), has sent some pics and info about one of the village’s favourite snacks: Vinkubala…caterpillars.

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Lots of yummy colourful caterpillars…a healthy snack

What? Yeah..caterpillars. What sounds like the most stereotype thing to say about Africa is actually a very, very healthy part of PAF members’ diet.

In Chinkonono those caterpillars are called Vinkubala. Wesley set out to catch them to bring home a surprise for his family for New Years Day.

As you can see the kids went crazy about them.

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Digging in

 

Those caterpillars can be found in some trees in the field around December and January. It is mostly a popular relish or snack around Southern Region.

Vinkubala provide the body with a lot of proteins, vitamines and many more nutrients. That is why during the 2 months people try to eat as many as they can. They are a valuable and important addition to the regular diet. Even the Zambian government recommends eating caterpillars.

As you can imagine, thinking of caterpillars, most kids at first are a bit hesitant and even scream when they see or touch them for the first time. But on the other hand they are more than eager to have them.

 

How to eat vinkubala, you ask? Well…obviously you put them in a dish and kids will try sort out the biggest ones for themselves first. πŸ˜‰ Then you have to get the outer shell off and remove the insides. Apply some salt, let them sit there for a few hours or a day. Then they are ready to be fried or cooked. You can add any ingredients you see fit.

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Yummy?! πŸ˜‰

Would you eat them? πŸ˜‰

 

Vinkubala, a Zambian Snack

Christmas is all around us

As you guy know our friends from Repairer Of The Breach sponsored our PAF xmas party. Lloyd just sent us a little report. Enjoy your read and merry xmas again!

“Christmas is a time of sharing. Family members and friends gather from far and wide to celebrate and reunite.
We in Chinkonono village were not left out of the festivities. Just like others around the world we gathered together to eat, sing and pray. It was indeed a wonderful time to see all members of the village assemble in the spirit of oneness.

This special christmas was made possible by PAF and our partners from ROTB. They donated money earlier on already for sewing machines and fabrics gave PAF money to purchase food stuff for the event. From the funds we were able to buy three bags of rice, two bags of maize meal, a bag of flour, 10 goats, 10 chickens and also some snacks for children.


It was a big day. Food was prepared by PAF and 248 people were fed. But it was not only feasting. We also used the event to educate the village on what Planting A Future was doing

These are:

  1. raising fruit trees seedlings for homes, schools and clinics.
  2. providing tailoring skills to people through the PAF-ROTB tailoring project.
  3. providing school sponsorship for hard working pupils from needy families
  4. sourcing for donations, information and advice from wellwishers, friends and donors for installing boreholes, libraries, schools
  5. encouraging the community through practical interventions and teach them new new ideas such as preserving fruits and vegetables by sun drying and solving problems like damming streams.

It was also an oppportunity to foster love and understanding among community members. Love without borders and love your neighbour as you love yourself were the themes. A pastor from the SDA Church preached a sermon from the book of Nehemiah on service to others Nehemiah 13 vs 14, psalms 133 vs 1 on brotherhood.
There was so much food that everyone ate to his or her full and even managed to carry some food to their homes. We also had two bags of rice and a bag of maize meal left.Β  These were donated to four old widows living on their own.


This was a big miracle for the village as nothing of its kind has ever happened. There was so much gratitude from the village to PAF and ROTB for feeding and bringing the village together.
It was indeed a Christmas.”

Christmas is all around us